I want to learn to weld!

jebuwh

New Member
Location
Layton
I've done a little bit of welding, and I mean very little growing up on an old cheap Lincoln mig. I really want to get better and hopefully be able to weld on my own sliders and other little projects here and there.

I've reached out to all the various community colleges around, no classes at the moment. I'm in Layton.

Is there anyone in Davis County/Ogden that would be willing to teach the basics? I'll absolutely compensate for time and materials. Also willing to donate time on project vehicles!
 

spaggyroe

Man Flu Survivor
Location
Lehi
An old Lincoln mig is still probably a pretty decent machine. My $.02 is to watch a few youtube instructional videos so you have the basics, then get out in the garage and start practicing. Yes you will suck at first. Keep practicing. Once you start to get the concept down, go watch more youtube videos, then go back to the garage and practice some more, etc, etc. Start building some non-critical projects and build up your skills before say, welding together a cage or 4-link brackets or something that you NEED to depend on.

And for the love of pete... don't think that flux core will be ok. Flux core welds seem to always look like ass. I wasted a lot of time and money messing around with flux core wire. Your mileage may vary, but I would say to skip it and go right to gas shielding.
 

Caleb

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Supporting Vendor
Location
Riverton
Flux core is perfectly fine. Right tool for the job. It definitely isn’t as pretty, but is perfectly strong for any part on a vehicle.

EDIT: just came across this article on flux core (self shielding) vs. gas shielding.

Agree with everything else said though, get something and go start practicing. I’ve always been a fan of learning on a non-mig because arc or oxyacetylene tend to be less forgiving and will force you in to a better technique and will help you learn the essentials, but if you’re only picking up a single machine, no problem learning on a mig. As for the machine, I bet most guys on here first machine was either an inexpensive Lincoln or Hobart and I know some guys have some really nice machines yet still keep their small machines around.
 

jebuwh

New Member
Location
Layton
Oh awesome! How did I miss that? Thank you. I will send him a message!

And yeah the old Lincoln definitely did the job, unfortunately I no longer have access to it, it stayed in California after I moved up here. But I am looking at getting something at some point. I am lucky to have a nice unused 220 in my garage that would work nicely for welding.
 

astjp2

Active Member
Location
Riverdale/Alaska
Flux core is perfectly fine. Right tool for the job. It definitely isn’t as pretty, but is perfectly strong for any part on a vehicle.

EDIT: just came across this article on flux core (self shielding) vs. gas shielding.

Agree with everything else said though, get something and go start practicing. I’ve always been a fan of learning on a non-mig because arc or oxyacetylene tend to be less forgiving and will force you in to a better technique and will help you learn the essentials, but if you’re only picking up a single machine, no problem learning on a mig. As for the machine, I bet most guys on here first machine was either an inexpensive Lincoln or Hobart and I know some guys have some really nice machines yet still keep their small machines around.
I started with a torch in 7th grade, but I was welding with a Marquette buzz box with a tig when I was about 10 years old. Dad had lots of tools, I just never appreciated them when I was that age, now I have a Mig, Tig/arc, spot welder, and a torch. I still have to break out the tig and practice with it. My spot welder also needs fixed. Maybe someday I will get all of my tools operational. Tim
 
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