Tell me about your shop

4x4_Welder

Active Member
Location
Twin Falls, ID
When running air, make sure you keep a fairly continuous slope to the line, and add a drain point on every drop. Unless you run a chiller air dryer, you will have moisture in the air. I like to run the whole line on a slight down slope away from the compressor, with a dedicated drain drop at the very end, and the actual air drops off the top of the pipe, so there is very little moisture getting to the tools.
Also, never use PVC. It eventually cracks and breaks, I've worked in shops that had it and when it fails it's like a shotgun with the shrapnel. It'll also kick the remaining pipe hard enough to put it through drywall.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
When running air, make sure you keep a fairly continuous slope to the line, and add a drain point on every drop. Unless you run a chiller air dryer, you will have moisture in the air. I like to run the whole line on a slight down slope away from the compressor, with a dedicated drain drop at the very end, and the actual air drops off the top of the pipe, so there is very little moisture getting to the tools.
Also, never use PVC. It eventually cracks and breaks, I've worked in shops that had it and when it fails it's like a shotgun with the shrapnel. It'll also kick the remaining pipe hard enough to put it through drywall.
Good point on the drain, even though we live in a desert and the condensation is minimal plan on a way to evacuate it. At my last shop that was all run in copper pipe I ran a "T" with the fitting and then below the "T" about 6" of copper with a ball valve for a drain. In my new Aircom system the dual manifolds actually have a small drain valve built into them which is a very nice feature and hardly noticeable to the naked eye.

Mike
 

mbryson

.......a few dollars more
Supporting Member
....Plan for heating and cooling.... a minisplit A/C with a heat pump seems to be a good solution and its probably what I'll be adding in the near future. I have a wood burning stove for heat, but think I'll swap it to a pellet stove with a big hopper and thermostat to control it. If I could maintain my shop at 55-60*'s thru the winter, then turn it up when I'm in there, I'd be a happy man. The wood burning stove needs to be constantly fed & adjusted. If your shop is too cold or hot, you won't want to spend too much time in it. A big ceiling fan would be nice for moving air around, too.
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so,

AC
Heat
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Radiant heat will be nice! I'm to the point of installing the boiler or water heater. Haven't decided which direction I'm going. I planned ahead and left a section down the center so I can bolt down lift to anything else in the floor.

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.....- Rather than a detached 2 car garage I ended up with an extra garage bay (4 car bays vs. 3) that is dedicated "shop" space. That price was 45k-ish for the detached vs 17.5k. The size of that extra bay is 12'x28. I also paid 2k extra to have the driveway width expanded 10'x30'x4". Upgrading from an 8' garage door to 9' door was $750. To be fair adding the extra bay was my wifes idea after I floated the detached garage knowing we didn't have the bankroll for it.
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If I'm building an attached garage at 1200+'. what do the cool kids do for heating/cooling? I think radiant heat would be fantastic but at what cost?
 
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Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
I want a mini split with a heat pump, myself...
but if you're pouring the slab, radiant heat in floor would be bitchen. But you need to insulate under the concrete underneath so you don't loose heat into the ground. Then a mini split for A/C!
 

Pile of parts

Well-Known Member
Location
South Jordan
The boiler is the expensive part of the radiant heat system. I was fortunate because my neighbor works for a company that designs and sells to the plumbers/contractors. He got me a screaming deal on everything so there was no way I was going with a different system. You can use a water heater in place of the boiler but I'm no expert on this so I really couldn't tell you much. YouTube, on the other hand, will make you an expert in no time. :rofl:

I do know this... For what cold was left after getting it running, I'm almost looking forward to next winter. Very even hear throughout the shop. Even up near the ceiling was no warmer than floor level. Unlike forced air, no real heat rise. Also, I could open my 12' x 24' door and once it was shut it was still warm. Again, unlike forced air, the heat doesn't escape in the wind. Everything in the shop absorbs the warmth and it stays that way.
Another benefit is no noise. You can't hear this running at all.

I do have another boiler that I'd make you a deal on if it would work for you. It was a little big and complex for my shop. I have a closed loop system. Depending on what you're thinking, it might work for you. I could give you the specs but you'd have to do the homework.

I didn't do anything for cooling except lots of insulation and windows I can open for a cross breeze. The shop gets some afternoon shade from the neighbors trees and my ceiling goes from about 14' to 18' at the peak. Hopefully any heat will stay up there. We'll see this summer.
 

Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
I've heard of people using a standard hot water heater, I'm sure you'd need a pump too.
 

mbryson

.......a few dollars more
Supporting Member
...I do have another boiler that I'd make you a deal on if it would work for you. It was a little big and complex for my shop. I have a closed loop system. Depending on what you're thinking, it might work for you. I could give you the specs but you'd have to do the homework.
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I'd be pretty interested in learning about the boiler. I'll check out the water heater versions as well.


thanks all!!!
 

4x4_Welder

Active Member
Location
Twin Falls, ID
I like radiant heat. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that you need to keep it on for the winter, unless you're going to be out of the shop for a week or so. If you try to run it like a standard heating system where you turn it up or down at different times, it will cost a fortune to run and will almost always be uncomfortable.
When I worked at AMET in Rexburg they would turn the heat down at night, so we'd come in to a cold building, by 9-9:30 it was comfortable, but then by 11 we had the doors open to try and cool the place down. I tried explaining this concept to the manager, he didn't think I knew what I was talking about, so we all got to keep suffering.
In floor radiant heat is very efficient if you just leave the temp steady and have decent insulation.
 
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