Tell me about your shop

#41
When running air, make sure you keep a fairly continuous slope to the line, and add a drain point on every drop. Unless you run a chiller air dryer, you will have moisture in the air. I like to run the whole line on a slight down slope away from the compressor, with a dedicated drain drop at the very end, and the actual air drops off the top of the pipe, so there is very little moisture getting to the tools.
Also, never use PVC. It eventually cracks and breaks, I've worked in shops that had it and when it fails it's like a shotgun with the shrapnel. It'll also kick the remaining pipe hard enough to put it through drywall.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
#42
When running air, make sure you keep a fairly continuous slope to the line, and add a drain point on every drop. Unless you run a chiller air dryer, you will have moisture in the air. I like to run the whole line on a slight down slope away from the compressor, with a dedicated drain drop at the very end, and the actual air drops off the top of the pipe, so there is very little moisture getting to the tools.
Also, never use PVC. It eventually cracks and breaks, I've worked in shops that had it and when it fails it's like a shotgun with the shrapnel. It'll also kick the remaining pipe hard enough to put it through drywall.
Good point on the drain, even though we live in a desert and the condensation is minimal plan on a way to evacuate it. At my last shop that was all run in copper pipe I ran a "T" with the fitting and then below the "T" about 6" of copper with a ball valve for a drain. In my new Aircom system the dual manifolds actually have a small drain valve built into them which is a very nice feature and hardly noticeable to the naked eye.

Mike
 
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