Topic of Discussion The Mahindra Roxor thread

DAA

Premium Member
Supporting Member
So... I haven't a clue as to the specifics of the legalities. And I got nothing against the Roxor, think they're kinda cute, actually.

But... If I owned a trademark and a copyright as iconic and valuable as Jeep, I'd defend it, ahhh, "vigorously".

Trademarks are only as enforceable as they are defended. Don't defend it, you can't enforce it. Can't really blame Jeep for wanting to defend the crap out of it?

- DAA
 

Diesel_Zuk

Active Member
I had recalled reading somewhere that Mahindra had license rights, and that link confirms it. To me, it sounds like fiat has their hands in the governments pockets. Similar to what happened to the samurai, they were killed off because they were smoking jeep in sales. Consumer reports exaggerated the rollover stories to slow and stop sales.
 

DAA

Premium Member
Supporting Member
I had recalled reading somewhere that Mahindra had license rights, and that link confirms it.
I read that link completely differently. I read it as, Mahindra most certainly did not have a license and was most certainly aware of that fact. The article says Mahindra has had a license to sell a completely different vehicle in a completely different country for 80 years. So, I read that as, Mahindra is intimately familiar with Jeep licensing.

The most damning section of that article is this quote: "It's worth noting that Mahindra did not contact FCA/Jeep at all regarding their bringing over what is, essentially, a non-highway approved version of their most iconic car".

So, like I say, I read that as Mahindra knows more about Jeep licensing than anyone, absolutely does not have a license for the Roxor in America and brought it to the American market without even talking to Jeep about it.

So, obviously, Jeep gonna sue. It's as inevitable as the passage of time. Mahindra had to be certain that they were going to get sued. I'll speculate that they must have thought they had a strong case for winning. Bad legal advice? Home cooking for Jeep? I've no idea. But that they were going to get sued was a foregone conclusion. Business is a contact sport.

- DAA
 

Diesel_Zuk

Active Member
I read that link completely differently. I read it as, Mahindra most certainly did not have a license and was most certainly aware of that fact. The article says Mahindra has had a license to sell a completely different vehicle in a completely different country for 80 years. So, I read that as, Mahindra is intimately familiar with Jeep licensing.

- DAA
Which link did you read? It says right in there they’ve held the license to build jeeps and the Jeep design since 1947 along with all the other manufacturers. They don’t have license of the 7 slot grill however.

Either way, I think it’s stupid and fully believe a lot of auto manufacturers are in bed with the government.
 

DAA

Premium Member
Supporting Member
Prolly the other way around. Gov't in bed with them.

A nation's auto industry can't be unentwined from it's politics.

No dog in it, myself. Not rooting for either side, just don't care. I just don't see it in terms of good guys or bad guys. Just business decisions and outcomes.

- DAA
 

Spork

Tin Foil Hat Equipped
So found this today

(i) A boxy body shape with flat appearing vertical side and rear body panels ending at about the same height as the hood;
(ii) Substantially flat hood with curved side edges that tapers to be narrower at the front;
(iii) Trapezoidal front wheel wells with front fenders or fender flares that extend beyond the front of the grille;
(iv) Flat appearing grille with vertical elongated grille slots and a trapezoidal outline that curves around round headlamps positioned on the upper part of the grille;
(v) Exterior hood latches;
(vi) Door cutouts above a bottom portion of the side body panels
With cars looking more an more alike everyday how many of these are something they could defend against or change easily?
(i) boxy shape? hello Land Rover or Suzuki Samurai, this isn't exactly something no other manufacturer has used if it's all about flat tweak and add a curve.
(ii) in my perfect world drop the front of the hood, improve visibility at the same time. I liked the Samurai design so get rid of the curves. or go full bro-dozer and angry eyes the grill X-D
(iii) Trapezoidal front wheel wells? these are clearly rounded. Fender flares? yea not something Jeep owns for IP or every manufacturer that has a flare needs to be included in this.
(iv) with the change in hood, tweak grill, I still don't think Jeep has a case here as long as they don't go to seven slots.
{v} Exterior hood latches, remove them
(vi) door cutouts above a bottom portion of the side body panel is bogus, if they want to really mess with Jeep boat side them with something functional for rock protection.
 

Stephen

Who Dares Wins
Supporting Member
Location
Salt Lake City
Which link did you read? It says right in there they’ve held the license to build jeeps and the Jeep design since 1947 along with all the other manufacturers. They don’t have license of the 7 slot grill however.

Either way, I think it’s stupid and fully believe a lot of auto manufacturers are in bed with the government.
They had a license to build and sell CJ-esq vehicle in India, not the US. The vehicle they sought permission to bring over was the Scorpion, which is a more modern, 4-door SUV.
Mahindra knew exactly what they were doing. They could have brought something that looked totally different over, but it wouldn't have traded in on those iconic CJ looks. That's what people are intrigued by with the Roxor, and that's what they banked on and it worked!
 

4x4_Welder

Well-Known Member
Location
Twin Falls, ID
There was going to be a chain of Mahindra truck dealers in the US, but the guy leading it has a bit of a history with failing to follow through on importing interesting vehicles. Same guy was responsible for the failure of the Cross Lander 244x SUV (which I wanted in unbelievable ways).
 

Houndoc

Registered User
Location
Grantsville
The idea of strict trademark enforcement of a vehicles looks, especially one off the market for decades, seems hard. We all know that styles are heavily based on what other manufacturers are finding sales.
 
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