General Tech What did you work on Today?

I Lean

Mbryson's hairdresser
Supporting Vendor
Location
Utah

STAG

Beach bummin
Location
Pleasant Grove
Does HI have the same "worker shortage" as everywhere else? I imagine your interviewers are foaming at the mouth at having a rockstar land in their laps. :D
It’s a little weird. I’ve applied at several places, and some have told me straight up “not hiring right now, but you can submit an application”

And then talking to this boss he says it’s hard to get the employees to show up on time, sometimes no-call/no-show at all, and then they will show up the next day. At my last job, that’s grounds for immediate termination. Here, he says “you can’t fire them or scold them, because there is no one to take their place” ha.

Seems like work flow is a little slower here anyways. He says the asphalt plant usually works from 7am-2:30pm.

I got offered a good wage (higher than I’ve ever been offered in Utah) and the hours would be a lot less than I’m used to, which I guess is win-win? I’d probably take home less $ than I’m used to because of the hours, (says they usually hit about 40-45, I’m used to 70+) but that will give more free time.

To be 100% honest, my “plan” if I see it working out that way, is to rent a small industrial space (1,000-2,000 sq ft) and likely pick up a CNC mill and maybe even a WAZER and see if I can get my foot in the door on some small manufacturing. I am sure I would have to get into online sales and be shipping parts off island for sure, as I don’t know if there is enough demand for solely island sales right now. I do have some products in mind I think would sell well in the online market.

I would love to be able to get out of construction all together, but for now I gotta take what job I can get on with.
 

xj_nate

Doctor, economist, polical expert, poser
Location
UT
What Carlos said. They have to be thrilled to have somebody with your skills. Knowing the back story of your experience with working too much I think that sounds like it would be great for you.
 

STAG

Beach bummin
Location
Pleasant Grove
What Carlos said. They have to be thrilled to have somebody with your skills. Knowing the back story of your experience with working too much I think that sounds like it would be great for you.
I’m addicted to that overtime check my guy.

Hard to have people give you a chance in a place out here where no one knows you. “Check out my Instagram” doesn’t really fly on job applications 😂
 

Tonkaman

Well-Known Member
Location
West Jordan
And then talking to this boss he says it’s hard to get the employees to show up on time, sometimes no-call/no-show at all, and then they will show up the next day.
That’s just island life. Everyone I’ve known that has done work in Hawaii has been recruited there because the local population can’t be bothered to work when the surf is good. That’s why so many general contractors doing work there are from the mainland and bring all their own guys.
 

NYCEGUY01

Well-Known Member
Location
Willard, UT
Cup holders....
I bought this seat a while back for my 85 squarebody but ended up using buckets instead. Seemed like it would be a good upgrade for the 78 stepside.
Its a rear seat from a 2018 crew cab with the Hi country package. Dark brown leather with tan trim.
The brackets were pretty simple to make and its mounted on factory squarebody sliders so it bolts in and out of the cab like the factory seat...
So far Im liking it...


seat.jpg
 

xj_nate

Doctor, economist, polical expert, poser
Location
UT
Between having a cold and a sore back I slept like garbage last night so I didn’t work today. After sleeping in late I decided it’s a perfect opportunity to do stuff I hate doing on my own time 🤣

I put an outlet in the pantry to charge the sucky-sucky thing. Pretty easy since there’s one on the other side of the wall but also quite nice to have.
BFA23A72-58DF-40C1-BF98-2538F844A04F.jpeg
Hung a mirror in the half-bath. The wife told the builder she didn’t want the glued-on, giant mirrors that came with the house. I just nodded and rolled my eyes. This one would’ve been a super easy install if the mounting holes weren’t 1/2” low on one side. I never thought I’d have to check something like that. Oh well, it looks nice I guess.
7DD7ED7D-F411-4EAB-972B-5BDCF7F71F34.jpeg
Added hooks under the shelf the mud room. Nothing crazy but still relatively time-consuming to do it right.
A64508A8-BD1E-48B0-BAB4-B33B4BDB04C9.jpeg
Happy wife happy life or whatever. She said thanks and I just said thank me later 😉
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Supporting Vendor
Location
West Haven, UT
I was able to finish up the 2005 Dodge 2500 last night.

Rooster comb/bullet kit from Central Valve Bodies arrived. Donny Lester is who I believe created the bullet for these many years ago and that is who I purchased the kit from off of eBay.
d1.jpg


Kit comes with the bullet and spring to replace the ball and spring detent that damages the very outermost area of the bore. It also comes with a new rooster comb as the one in this truck had excessive wear in the area at the Park position. Also came with a new seal, washer and e-clip.
d2.jpg


Saw this little trick on YouTube where a guy used a piece of 3/16" brake line to create a means of holding the bullet and spring in the bore while lining everything up to install the rooster comb. Pretty slick trick and since I had about a 6" length of 3/16" brake line left over from the square body I did a couple of weeks ago I thought I'd give it a try. Works fantastic. Figured I needed just under 2" long length of tubing.
d3.jpg


Ended up just shy of 1.9".
d4.jpg


Newly made tool holding the bullet and spring in the bore.
d5.jpg


Next this allowed me to ensure the throttle valve lever was properly aligned with the stop and the manual valve was aligned to accept the lever from the rooster comb.
d6.jpg


Next set the rooster comb in place and when everything is lined up press downward and it pushed the piece of tubing off the detent bullet and the rooster comb takes its place. Then use a magnet to grab the tubing from under the rooster comb and finish assembling the rooster comb with seal, washer and e-clip.
d7.jpg


Don't forget to install the parking lever before stabbing the valve body back into the transmission. I also applied a small amount of Sil-glyde to the o-rings on the electrical connector to aid in assembling through the bore in the case without tearing or damaging the o-rings.
d8.jpg


I lubed up the accumulator piston with some petroleum jelly and put it in the bore and then the accumulator spring in place on the valve body then it is ready to install.
d9.jpg



More pictures to follow.....
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Supporting Vendor
Location
West Haven, UT
Prior to installing the valve body I figured I would check the band adjustments. With 164k it couldn't hurt. Both front and rear bands were pretty close.

Here is the rear band adjustment.
d10.jpg


Front band anchor.
d11.jpg


Front band adjustment on the outside of the case.
d12.jpg


After the valve body is installed and torqued to spec. I installed the new filter and then the pan and buttoned everything up.
d13.jpg


Everything back together, fluids filled and back from a road test and ready for the owner to pick up.
d14.jpg


Thanks for looking.

Mike
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Supporting Vendor
Location
West Haven, UT
@zmotorsports how do you know so much about so many different machines? I get that you've been working on stuff for decades but you seem to have all the tricks for every make and model. What is your secret source of info?

First of all, I'm flattered. I try to be as professional and knowledgeable as possible about things I'm working on but there is NO way to have the knowledge for everything out there, although some think they've got it. :rofl:

Yes, I've been doing this a long time and have worked on a very wide range of things over the past 35+ years but things change over time and problem areas for each also change. I do a lot of reading in my spare time with the intent of always trying to gain more knowledge and improve my skillset.

Next, when working on something I am unfamiliar with I take the basic skillset I have of how things work, basic mechanical aptitude and apply it as far as I can when going into new territory. If/when I get to something I am unfamiliar with I revert back to the basics to see how things come apart and then search the internet for either wiring schematics or exploded views to help me. I am always seeking to understand more than anything.

When I first started out I met people who specialized in certain fields and while they were good at what they did and knew that one thing very well, I always wondered what would happen if that one thing went away or was no longer in need or demand. That drove me to try and be more well rounded vs. specializing. I think that has also been to my advantage as I work on various things.

Probably the biggest factor was early in my career when I was trying to go from my apprentice level pay and knowledge to what we called journeyman level I had asked my boss and mentor what I needed to do to become a Journeyman mechanic. He smiled and told me it is never ending and you should always be learning. He shared a quote with me that has stuck with me for 35 years now and I roll it over in my head quite a bit, especially when I have something I'm working on that is kicking my ass. He said "knowledge itself is of no value, it is the use of that knowledge that makes it valuable." I took that to mean you can be the smartest person in the world but if you don't use that to benefit yourself or anyone else, it's worthless. I have tried to use my knowledge to benefit myself and my family all these years by taking on work and projects that may be outside my wheelhouse but I sought to gain an understanding of and to get experience with.

Then he asked me what I thought a Journeyman mechanic was? That caught me off guard but I told him it was one of the senior guys in the shop that seemed like they could fix most things that come through the shop door. He said, "I'll take it one step further and say it is someone who can fix ANYTHING if you put an electrical schematic and/or service manual in front of them". I took it literally and have tried to apply my basic skillset that I started my career with, taught to me by my dad, and build upon that with each and every job I do.

I have no formal schooling and everything has had to be learned by the school of hard knocks but it has taught me one valuable lesson and that is to not rely on anyone and just figure shit out for myself. Especially since my dad and my mentor have both passed, I figure I have no one to turn to for advice so it falls on my shoulders to figure things out for myself.

Sorry for the long explanation but in case you can't tell I am VERY passionate about being a mechanic, sometimes too passionate. I have had a couple of exceptional role models and mentors in my life and I continually try to measure up to their examples. My father was not an educated man but could fix about anything. It may not have looked the best but it would function. My old boss and mentor took that to the next level and his approach to fixing things was almost non-human as he was so meticulous and anal about things. He had made a great life for himself and his family spinning wrenches and I aspired to be like him from an early age. He was one of the best mechanics I have ever known and I am continually trying to measure up. He also had one of the most well equipped home shops I had ever seen and I sought to match or exceed that and with the help of my wonderful wife I feel like I have finally accomplished that. I take what I do very seriously and try to continue to learn and build upon my skillset. I don't think I will ever be as good as I want to be as I keep falling short of what I think my father and mentor would expect from me.
 

glockman

I hate Jeeps
Location
Pleasant Grove
First of all, I'm flattered. I try to be as professional and knowledgeable as possible about things I'm working on but there is NO way to have the knowledge for everything out there, although some think they've got it. :rofl:

Yes, I've been doing this a long time and have worked on a very wide range of things over the past 35+ years but things change over time and problem areas for each also change. I do a lot of reading in my spare time with the intent of always trying to gain more knowledge and improve my skillset.

Next, when working on something I am unfamiliar with I take the basic skillset I have of how things work, basic mechanical aptitude and apply it as far as I can when going into new territory. If/when I get to something I am unfamiliar with I revert back to the basics to see how things come apart and then search the internet for either wiring schematics or exploded views to help me. I am always seeking to understand more than anything.

When I first started out I met people who specialized in certain fields and while they were good at what they did and knew that one thing very well, I always wondered what would happen if that one thing went away or was no longer in need or demand. That drove me to try and be more well rounded vs. specializing. I think that has also been to my advantage as I work on various things.

Probably the biggest factor was early in my career when I was trying to go from my apprentice level pay and knowledge to what we called journeyman level I had asked my boss and mentor what I needed to do to become a Journeyman mechanic. He smiled and told me it is never ending and you should always be learning. He shared a quote with me that has stuck with me for 35 years now and I roll it over in my head quite a bit, especially when I have something I'm working on that is kicking my ass. He said "knowledge itself is of no value, it is the use of that knowledge that makes it valuable." I took that to mean you can be the smartest person in the world but if you don't use that to benefit yourself or anyone else, it's worthless. I have tried to use my knowledge to benefit myself and my family all these years by taking on work and projects that may be outside my wheelhouse but I sought to gain an understanding of and to get experience with.

Then he asked me what I thought a Journeyman mechanic was? That caught me off guard but I told him it was one of the senior guys in the shop that seemed like they could fix most things that come through the shop door. He said, "I'll take it one step further and say it is someone who can fix ANYTHING if you put an electrical schematic and/or service manual in front of them". I took it literally and have tried to apply my basic skillset that I started my career with, taught to me by my dad, and build upon that with each and every job I do.

I have no formal schooling and everything has had to be learned by the school of hard knocks but it has taught me one valuable lesson and that is to not rely on anyone and just figure shit out for myself. Especially since my dad and my mentor have both passed, I figure I have no one to turn to for advice so it falls on my shoulders to figure things out for myself.

Sorry for the long explanation but in case you can't tell I am VERY passionate about being a mechanic, sometimes too passionate. I have had a couple of exceptional role models and mentors in my life and I continually try to measure up to their examples. My father was not an educated man but could fix about anything. It may not have looked the best but it would function. My old boss and mentor took that to the next level and his approach to fixing things was almost non-human as he was so meticulous and anal about things. He had made a great life for himself and his family spinning wrenches and I aspired to be like him from an early age. He was one of the best mechanics I have ever known and I am continually trying to measure up. He also had one of the most well equipped home shops I had ever seen and I sought to match or exceed that and with the help of my wonderful wife I feel like I have finally accomplished that. I take what I do very seriously and try to continue to learn and build upon my skillset. I don't think I will ever be as good as I want to be as I keep falling short of what I think my father and mentor would expect from me.
I always appreciate the detail you put into your work and how you document it and share. I learn something from each of your posts. When I am in my own shop half assing something I tell myself, Mike wouldn't accept that and you shouldn't either😂. It's good to have that voice that holds us accountable, even if it's all in our head.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Supporting Vendor
Location
West Haven, UT
I always appreciate the detail you put into your work and how you document it and share. I learn something from each of your posts. When I am in my own shop half assing something I tell myself, Mike wouldn't accept that and you shouldn't either😂. It's good to have that voice that holds us accountable, even if it's all in our head.

Thank you. And for the record I think I have too many voices in my head already. :rofl:
 
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