General Tech What did you work on Today?

pkrfctr

Registered User
Location
Spanish Fork, UT
Mounted 2 ARB twin compressors and got them running. Compressors are mounted to the driver side inside the tuffy rear deck. The wiring runs behind the rear seats to distribution blocks. 200 amp fuse on 4 awg runs back to the power blocks. 9 gallon air tank underniether and air chucks front and rear.
 

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cruiseroutfit

Cruizah!
Moderator
Premium Vendor
Location
Sandy, Ut
Mounted 2 ARB twin compressors and got them running. Compressors are mounted to the driver side inside the tuffy rear deck. The wiring runs behind the rear seats to distribution blocks. 200 amp fuse on 4 awg runs back to the power blocks. 9 gallon air tank underniether and air chucks front and rear.
Watch the heat out of those compressors, they'll melt hose right out of the comoresssor.
 

UT410

On jack stands.
Premium Member
Location
Holladay
I've had this old Hazet Assistent tool "trolley" for a while. They've got a cult-like following from German auto and tool enthusiasts, which makes the carts and accessories pretty expensive.

The articulating lamps they make for these are pretty neat but the prices I'd find them for scared me away. Over the last year or so, I've seen two sell for about $700! I know they're rare and all... but that's rediculous.

So, me being me, I set out to find my own alternative. I built my own for about $90 total using a vintage Craftsman articulating lamp that was likely mounted to a lathe. I got some help from @BlueWolfFab with the adapter.

I documented it on my website if you'd like to see the what and how and such: https://tools365.net/hazet-assistent-lamp/

Articulating Lamp Engine Bay.jpg Craftsman Articulating Lamp Stock Lathe Mount.jpg Craftsman Hazet Adapter Finished.jpg DIY Hazet Articulating Lamp.jpg Hazet Assistent in Tools365 Shop.jpg Hazet with Accessory Lamp Test Fit Over Samurai Engine Bay.jpg
 

tv_larsen

Well-Known Member
Location
Logan, Utah
This last summer I reassembled and revived my long slumbering 1975 W200. A few months later the 440's cam sprocket bolt came loose and many bent valves were the result. o_O

So I just finished reassembling it again. This time with new Edelbrock E-street aluminum heads, Summit SUM-6400 cam and timing chain, and dozens of other new parts.

I also installed a Borgeson steering shaft, ORD crossover steering, and rebuilt the power steering box.
 

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zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
I've been working on getting electrical sorted out in what I'm calling "shop build phase 1." Its consists of (5) double gang boxes of 110v outlets split between two breakers and (4) additional 220v outlets also split between two breakers. The 110 outlets are 48" above ground and the 220 outlets are 55" up.

Everyone knows that no matter how well you try and plan or organize a move crap just gets put everywhere anyway and thats what happened with us when we moved in 2 weeks ago. After some shuffling I was able to get both our cars in garages our first night at the house. (Really not that impressive...) After setting up some big costco shelves I was able to clear more space and start to organize a little.



Boxes mounted on the "phase 1 wall."


Second lumber rack up along with my finishing and nuts/bolts bin shelves.


Conduit in with wires and outlets partially installed.


Sub panel.


To finish this up I need covers for the 220v twist lock receptacles. Lowes had them for the range/dryer size outlets but those are too big. I can't find them on the HD website so rather than crossing my fingers that they will have them I may end up just going to an electrical supply house at lunch today. I bought all my outlets and breakers for this project (and phase 2 and 3) off amazon and saved about 50% while also getting a better quality product I think. The 110 outlets are commercial grade and I had wanted different colors to match the different circuits but didn't justify spending more for that.

Phase 2 is outlets in the ceiling for costco LED lights and an ambient air cleaner and phase 3 is to extend the outlets from phase 1 to the back and side walls as needed after using the shop for a while. I bought plenty of wire, conduit, and other supplies for both of these so I'll get phase 2 going sooner rather than later.
Congrats on the move Nate. I've been away for a while and didn't realize you were looking to move. Looks like a great place and look forward to seeing it progress.

Mike
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
I've had this old Hazet Assistent tool "trolley" for a while. They've got a cult-like following from German auto and tool enthusiasts, which makes the carts and accessories pretty expensive.

The articulating lamps they make for these are pretty neat but the prices I'd find them for scared me away. Over the last year or so, I've seen two sell for about $700! I know they're rare and all... but that's rediculous.

So, me being me, I set out to find my own alternative. I built my own for about $90 total using a vintage Craftsman articulating lamp that was likely mounted to a lathe. I got some help from @BlueWolfFab with the adapter.

I documented it on my website if you'd like to see the what and how and such: https://tools365.net/hazet-assistent-lamp/

View attachment 117332 View attachment 117333 View attachment 117334 View attachment 117335 View attachment 117336 View attachment 117337

Nice light Brent. Pretty cool having it mounted to your tool/work cart.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
I've been away for quite a while trying to get caught up on projects that my son and I had planned before we moved two years ago. This past year we went into "catch up" mode and finally got around to completing phase I of his new Jeep project. He sold his 2004 LJ a little over a year ago because he wanted to build another Grand Cherokee with a V8. He looked for about six months to find a fairly clean virgin WJ that no one had cut on or messed up. He found a very clean 2004 with the 4.7 V8 engine. It has some miles on it but overall a very clean Jeep to start with.

He then proceeded to get everything mechanically sound and in perfect running condition, changing all fluids, tune-up, etc. and then in July we threw it on the lift and cut all of the suspension out from under it in preparation for Phase I of his build. He wanted to upgrade the drivetrain and long-arm the suspension so we started with a clean slate as far as undercarriage goes. We added stiffeners to the uni-body frame rails although the WJ probably doesn't need them as the main structure of the WJ is much more stronger than its predecessor the ZJ.

We then found a rear 2016 JK Dana 44 axle with less than 100 miles on it and he wanted to use my front OEM Dana44 axle housing that I removed from my 2011 JKUR two years ago when I built my ProRock 44. We also built a triangulated 4-link rear suspension and a Y-link front suspension along with frame mounts. Limiting straps, Fox 2.0 shocks, 6.5" IRO coil springs and many one-off custom brackets were fabricated for the build. He also built a NP231 transfer case with Advance Adapters Extreme Duty SYE and Tom Woods 1310 double cardan driveshafts.

Once we got the Jeep completed we realized we couldn't hit that magic caster number without inducing some front driveshaft vibrations so we had to remove the front axle and clock the knuckles. We were somewhat expecting that when we built the front axle but I thought we could get lucky and be able to keep the pinion angle reasonable enough and still get at least 4 to 5 degrees of caster for handling but during road tests we just couldn't get there so rather than keep messing with it we just removed the front axle and put everything where it needed to be.

All in all for a 3+ month project getting the suspension and drivetrain phase completed I think it turned out pretty good and looks to be a nice clean build and something that should last him a long time. I think his next phase is going to be building bumpers, tire carrier and sliders. But that will have to hold off for another couple of weeks until I get mine done.

Here is what the shell looked like after removing the OEM suspension and axles.


Boxing plates in place and welded after fine tuning for fitment.






Just one of many late nights that we spent on this build over the latter part of summer and into fall.


Once the frame was boxed we focused on the rear axle.


Bare housing ready for welding.


Axle truss welded in place.












Welded upper suspension mounts for the triangulated 4-link.




I machined some 1”-14 tube adapters for my son’s rear suspension.


Calculated and bent the 2"x.250" DOM tubing. Definitely overkill for this build as far as tubing size and wall thickness.


Rear links welded and mocked into position one final time.




 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
Moving on to the front now and started on the front suspension mounting points for the frame.

We cut the four side plates then bolted them together for grinding to ensure they are all symmetrical.


Base plates, side plates and bolt hole reinforcement washers cut and ready for welding










Mocked up, bolted together and ready for final welding.


Welded.














Completed and ready to weld onto the frame.


Artec Industries raised track bar mount on the front axle and we moved the JK spring buckets inboard 1.4375" so the coil springs would be perpendicular and mate up to the WJ upper spring perches.












 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
Welded the front suspension mounts onto the frame rails that were built previously.






We turned out attention to beefing up the OEM WJ track bar frame mount and prepping the WJ pitman arm to accept the Teraflex HD drag link in which we installed in the flipped position to mate with the Reid knuckles.




Then finished welding the front suspension mounts to the frame rails.




While we had the room we removed the pitman arm to drill it out to accept a slightly larger drag link end. Set it up in the mill and drilled to accept the new tapered sleeve.






Welded and machined the tube adapters in preparation for building the front suspension links.






Positioned the front axle under the Jeep and mocked the tires into place.




Turned out attention to the transfer cases in which we had to swap input gears from the NP247 to the NP231.
The 247 turn apart and input removed.


Inputs torn apart and ready to swap.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
We then focused on building the lower links and fabricated the plates for the upper part of the Y-links.


All four cut and finished to the same size.




Mocked together with spacers.




Welded up the lower links.






Ready to bolt into position.


Passenger side bolted in and ready to cut the material for the upper part of the Y-link.


Driver’s side.


Next up was fabricating the track bar. Machined the tube adapter and welded it into the 1.5” x .250” wall DOM tubing. Root pass.


Cover (weave) pass.


My son machined an aluminum slug to use for mock-up so we didn’t have to press the bushing in and back out multiple times. Here it is ready to bolt in.


Track bar in position.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
We had machined the upper tubes for the front suspension to accept the tube adapters.


Mocked into position to tack weld.


Ready for final welding.






Gussets welded on.




Tube adapters second (weave) pass over root weld.


Upper links done.


Test fit.


While I was welding my son knocked out a couple of gussets for the Y-Link brackets.


Gussets welded in place.


Links all removed from the Jeep and ready to go off for powder coating.


I then decided to machine the components for the upper bumpstops.
I machined four 2” diameter tubes/spacers from DOM. I also machined four threaded bungs measuring .5” thick and pressed them in 1/4”. These are threaded to 7/16”-14 to accept a standard TJ bucket.


Threaded bungs welded into the spacers.








Bumpstop standoffs welded in place on the Jeep.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
Finished up transfer case while waiting for links to be powder coated.

Removed the blind bearing in the back half of the case.


Look at how much beefier the Advance Adapter’s SYE mainshaft is compared to the OEM.


Shaft assembly with mode selector installed and ready to slide into case.


Cases assembled after a small bead of sealant applied and fasteners torqued to specification. Pump on the back half awaiting the tail cone which I just applied a small bead of sealant.




Assembled other than front yolk, rear output flange and input seal.




Transfer case completed and ready to install in the Jeep.


After we bolted the transfer case in we started on the rear axle by getting all of the parts set out, cleaned, inspected and ready for installation. He is installing 4.56:1 gears and I wanted my son to build the axles so I supervised and assisted when needed.




Removed the pinion bearing to see what the factory shim thickness was. After measuring the .050” shim we set it aside for using on the initial setup. At .050” this was the thickest of the past half dozen or so Dana 44’s that I’ve done.


Time to get out the set-up bearings.




We pressed the ring gear onto the Eaton TrueTrac carrier at commenced to torque the ring gear bolts after applying red Loctite.


 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
After the ring gear was installed we heated the carrier bearings and installed them so they could cool before needing to handle the carrier. One of the things I was trying to reiterate to my son is thinking through the process to alleviate waiting time and to keep the work flowing. By getting the carrier ready and it cooling we could focus on the pinion.


Case spreader installed, housing cleaned and pinion races removed.


Time to get the assortment of shims standing by.




Ring gear painted with marking compound and ready for initial test.


Pinion way too deep with the pattern too close to the flank. Backlash was also a bit tight at .003”.




He took it all back apart and installed a .041” pinion shim that I had in my assortment.


That turned out to be the ticket. A slight alteration to the carrier side shim packs and it netted us exactly what we were after. Beautiful water pattern on both drive and coast sides with a backlash of .008”.




Engraved all of the specs on the ring gear. Ended up at 22 in/lbs of pinion bearing preload with an addition 8 in/lbs of carrier bearing preload after releasing the case spreader.
 

zmotorsports

Hardcore Gearhead
Location
West Haven
Front axle assembled.




Housing cleaned.


Pressing the seals into the housing.


It took a total of four times together and apart before we got the correct pinion depth and pattern.


Final assembly with new bearings. Ended up @ .044” pinion shim, 25 in/lbs pinion preload, .008” backlash and plus 11 in/lbs of carrier preload.


My son installing the ARB differential cover and buttoning it up.


Axles at the ready for last mock-up.


Ten Factory chromoly axle shafts installed.






We bolted the suspension into the Jeep for the last mock-up before final assembly.










Next up was to weld in the upper mounts for the Kartek limiting straps. They will reside between the shock and the coils spring and allow enough droop yet stop about 1.5” before the shock reaches maximum extension.


Once the front straps were taken care of we moved around to the rear. We didn’t care for the orientation of the rear upper shock mounts nor the thin material they were made of. For a stock WJ with only a few inches of travel I’m sure they are adequate but with the amount of flex this Jeep now has I think it will be too weak.

We cut some upper shock mounts out of 1/4” mild steel after making cardboard templates. I love using my RotoKut cutters for projects like this. Perfectly round holes and clean cut. Just use plenty of cutting fluid and don’t force them, let the cutters eat and they cut through easily.








 
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