Topic of Discussion What to do in the event of a rollover.

solidfrontaxle

Toyota jihad
Location
Casper, Wyoming
I'm glad I read this thread a while back. The other day I rolled my Toyota going down a hill (dang double shackles - NEVER use them). I did not have my seatbelt on. I was ok, probably because I rolled going a quarter mph, and didn't try to hold onto anything. Luckily I had plenty of tools (all strapped down in the cab and bed). Without any of them and I would still be stuck in the desert cuz there is no way anyone was even going to find us or get to us to pull us out. I used a hi-lift as a come along (w/ two chains) to pull on the far frame rail, while my tow strap looped around the near side frame rail, under the truck, to a tree on the opposite side. This allowed me to pull the truck over onto its side without sliding it toward me on its top. Once on its side, I removed the tow strap and dug holes for the tires to dig into and pivot about as I pulled the truck the rest of the way over. The truck was in reverse and the parking brake was on, so it did not roll downhill when it landed back on its tires. I would have to say that the the entire recovery process was 100 times more dangerous than actually rolling the truck. After cleaning up all broken glass and as much spilt fluids as possible, I remembered something I read on this thread about hydrolock. So I carefully bumped the key (with my fire extinguisher on standby) and sure enough the engine didn't even turn a half revolution before it locked up (the truck was upsidedown or on its side for about 4 hours). I pulled the spark plugs and cranked it over until oil stopped coming out. There was alot of oil in the first two cylinders. I also had to siph some brake fluid into the clutch res., but other than that, all fluids were good. Started right up, and burned oil for a couple minutes, but the dang toyota never ran better. I drove it sixty miles home.
So, I am going to have to say great thread, I'm glad I listened to and heeded the advice on here because it saved me and my truck more damage and money.
Things I learned:
-Double shackles (and any setup that allows your axle to drop without a resisting spring force) are freakin dangerous. Where I rolled, a normal truck wouldn't have even lifted a tire. I still have no idea how it really happened.
-You can never have too many tools-jacks, chains, straps, shovels, axes, saws, fire extingushers, etc. (I needed them all).
-Roll bars are great. I didn't have one, but I had a camper shell which kept the cab from getting totally crushed. I wont ever wheel again without a cage.
-Have lots of water. It was probably 90 degrees and luckily cloudy. A normal southern utah day would have baked us to death.
-Carry all spare fluids, especially oil and brake.
-Be VERY careful when getting it back over. Hi-lift jacks are essential, but also darn scary, especially when tensioning fifty feet of chain.
 

Tacoma

Et incurventur ante non
Location
far enough away
A cage is like 3rd on my list of build plans. You can roll mild rigs too, they're not any lighter than built ones... and a hell of a lot weaker.
 

RockMonkey

Suddenly Enthusiastic
Super Moderator
COOL! Not that you rolled your junk, but COOL that you had read this thread and it helped you to do what needed to be done when the incident happened.
 

ROCKRUNNER

Active Member
Location
SLC
Things I learned:
-Double shackles (and any setup that allows your axle to drop without a resisting spring force) are freakin dangerous. Where I rolled, a normal truck wouldn't have even lifted a tire. I still have no idea how it really happened.
-You can never have too many tools-jacks, chains, straps, shovels, axes, saws, fire extingushers, etc. (I needed them all).
-Roll bars are great. I didn't have one, but I had a camper shell which kept the cab from getting totally crushed. I wont ever wheel again without a cage.
-Have lots of water. It was probably 90 degrees and luckily cloudy. A normal southern utah day would have baked us to death.
-Carry all spare fluids, especially oil and brake.
-Be VERY careful when getting it back over. Hi-lift jacks are essential, but also darn scary, especially when tensioning fifty feet of chain.





WOW! All that and you did'nt even learn to wear your seat belt. That should be the most important lesson learned. That is one lesson you would just hate to learn the hard way most people don't get a second chance. I unfortunatly have seen it first hand. I will agree it can get dangerous on the recovery side of things and it is a good idea to always take a buddy(hopefully one with a winch) It sounds like you were'nt expecting it or planning on the possability of rolling, but for some reason that is always when something like that happens.

On the double shackles try a center limiting strap it will still allow the full amount of flex, but won't open up on you. Glad to hear you are OK! :)
 

solidfrontaxle

Toyota jihad
Location
Casper, Wyoming
ROCKRUNNER said:
WOW! All that and you did'nt even learn to wear your seat belt.

Yeah, I know. The one time I don't wear it and my truck flops. I'm not sure how I came out so unscathed. But you are right, the possibilty of rolling was so remote that I took no precautions against it. Bad idea, I guess.
The double shackles are going bye bye. I never really liked them, they were just something cheap to get my my truck running. I didn't feel like welding on new shackle mounts. Another bad idea. DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!
 

74highboy

Registered User
Location
slc
James K said:
Keep your hands inside the ride at all times! YOU ARE NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO HOLD THE WEIGHT OF THE VEHICLE.

are school does a yearly trip to moab one year a kid kept his sami from rolling on its side by sticking his arm out and grabing a rock he did it but the next day his whole arm was swolen
 

James K

NO, I'm always like this
Location
Taylorsville, Ut
74highboy said:
are school does a yearly trip to moab one year a kid kept his sami from rolling on its side by sticking his arm out and grabing a rock he did it but the next day his whole arm was swolen


that doesn't make it right.
 

SUPERFLY

CaptainRob
Location
sugar house
i rolled my cruiser a while back, i was stupid but i got way lucky, it was a full complete roll, so we didnt have to tip it back over SEAT BELTS SAVE LIVES only injury was i broke a finger and im still not sure how it happend

my advice to any one who ever rolls/4wheels/drives on the road/whatever
1. wear a selt belt
2. wear a seat belt
3. make sure everyone in your rig is wearing a seat belt
4. after the rolls make sure everone is ok, then laugh about it. if everyone is ok, count your blessings, laugh a little, its just a car, itll give you more things to work on, (now you have a buggy project!... maybe)
5. dont blame your spotter, he probably feels bad but make sure he knows it wasnt his fault, its your fault for trying the obstical.
 

grinch

inner city redneck
Location
Salt Lake City
Here is one. Keep a good attitude. I hate it when somone rolles thier rig and gets all pissed at the world. I dont want to help em out if they are mad at thier own mistake. A good attitude can take a not so good situation and make it fun. Thats what its all about isnt it??? Then agian Ive never been in or seen a roll over so I might be wrong. :rofl:
 
Why hasn't anyone suggested trying to drive out of a roll-over :rofl: I try all the time when it happens to me ;)

There are many great responses in this thread, harnesses fastened over the shoulders as well (instead of dangling over the side of your rig), like most said...those with compartment space, have everything tied down inside...getting hit with your own flying debris can be very dangerous and roll-overs can happen when least expected, but if you are attempting questionable lines, put on a helmet ;)

From what a few of us around here noticed as well, TJ's (Jeeps with 4.0L) that are 2000 and newer when rolled to the drivers side, especially when they come to rest on the left side, don't attempt to turn them over. Do the spark plug removal thingy. The 2000 and newer TJ's seem to have a bad thing happen if you go and crank them over, the Big Bang Theory is reincarnated :D Sometimes even tapping the key will make these things turn over, play it safe and remove the plugs.

This is out of a 2003 Rubi with 7000 miles on it (And we have seen similar damage to 2000 and up TJ's)

f0952fda.jpg


f0952fdc.jpg


The older ones like mine (1995 ZJ) can roll and rest on any side including the roof and no matter how long they stay there, they fire right up when cranked over.
 

jeepers

Registered User
Location
murray ut
hold on for life keep your hands in the jeep or rig i went wheelin with jake mecham this weekend in little moab he rolled his buggy five times good times but yeah i think your done for if you don't have a full roll cage good seat belts if i rolled my jeep i would lay down in the seat so nothing cave's in on you
 

waynehartwig

www.jeeperman.com
Location
Mead, WA
Be careful unbuckling yourself/passengers and make sure that when you do, nobody is around the rig. Just the simple fact of you shifting the weight, can cause the thing to rolll again. After you unbuckle, and everyone is out, then start the recovery effort. I saw three people get seriously injured when they ran to the aid of a roller and were sqaushed when he undid his seat belt. Remember, safety first. The rig isn't near that important!
 

xjc

I give up :(
Location
Ogden Utah
For all the samurai owners, you probably can right your overturned samurai by hand but remember to use proper lifting technique. Lift with you legs not you back!

Allways stand on the up side of the hill

Never, ever, ever ever, wheel in the deep depths of the desert with one rig!!! Buddy system
 

Bart

Registered User
Location
Arm Utah
Wow, this thread was brought back from the past. Since I didn't contribute before, I'll add now. Along with what Braden and Carl said I'd like to add, make sure put it in gear before you upright it and don't jump on the tire that's in air for a picture. I've seen 3 nasty falls when this happened.
 

Goose

aToYoTa-fREak
Location
A.F. UT.
I dont know if anyone mentioned this, but a decent first aid kit is a no brainer. example- my wife rolled the truk just past the crak on golden spike. unfortunately she was one of those who put there arm out the window to break the fall. her hand was badly crushed, it wasnt a good situation knowing we were at least 2 to 3 hours from the hospital. Im sure the ride would have been twice as long for her had we not brought some basic first aid stuff. : sterile wraps & some good pain killers. The pain killers seemed to realy help her calm down & keep her from going into severe shock. anyway just thought Id share a lesson learned from personal exerience. (grab bars to hold onto are a must for me so that Im not tempted to stick my arm out).
 

bowtied1

New Member
All of the above advise is great, I would like to add, I have always trained my passenger to grab my lap belt in a roll. When they do this, it pulls them to the center of the compartment, keeps their hands in the vehicle, and also keeps my belt tighter and holds me in position better.
 
Top