Google AdWords

Jesser04

Well-Known Member
Location
Kaysville Utah
#1
Does anyone know anything about setting it up? I’ve been using google AdWords express for a few days with good results. My price per click is averaging 1.72 and I’m getting 10-12 clicks a day with 8-10 map actions a day. What I’m gathering is none of my competitors in my 15 mile radius are using this tech. What I’d like to do is add some of my competitors business names in my search phrases. C1A29EE3-203B-4308-A7B7-041A9027AD97.png
 
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Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
#4
I've ran some successful AdWords campaigns in the past, but it's been YEARS.... I think we could have a helpful discussion on here, if you guys are interested. I'm NOT claiming to know it all, but I'm sure we can find plenty of helpful info. Would that help?
 

Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
#8
What are your goals with running an AdWords campaign? Getting more visits to your site? Getting your name out there? Or more phone calls?

And if I can ask, what kind of business are you in?
 

Jesser04

Well-Known Member
Location
Kaysville Utah
#9
I’m in th dry cleaning business. My goal is new customers I’ve been running print ads for years and 80-90% of my coupons are return customers. I see an opportunity with pay per click to get new customers. AdWordsexpress has work great if just like to put my competitors names in the key words and you can’t do that with express. 25% of my clicks are my businesses name so I’m assuming the same is happening for them too if I can redirect some of them to my site that would be great.
 

Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
#10
That's good to know, thanks! Looks like AWExpress is the mobile app, like most mobile apps it's probably fairly limited compared to the full site. I would recommend you sit down with AdWords on a PC and see what you can do. - https://adwords.google.com/home

I did a search and found this. - http://www.azrights.com/media/news-...g/2014/11/using-competitors-names-in-adwords/

Competitors’ Names In Adwords



In a past blog post, we reported an earlier decision regarding trademark infringement, M&S and Interflora. Here we discuss last week’s Court of Appeal decision to retry the dispute between M&S and Interflora, which means further uncertainty about whether you should bid on competitors’ trademarks when using Adwords.
In May 2013, the High Court ruled that M&S had infringed Interflora’s trademark by bidding on the word “Interflora” to trigger results for its own flower delivery service. M&S appealed the decision. Last week the Court of Appeal sent the case back to the High Court for retrial.
In making its decision in the case (Interflora v Marks and Spencer), the Court of Appeal said they doubted a significant proportion of consumers would mistakenly believe that M&S was part of Interflora’s network. However, as the court had not analysed all the relevant documents or seen the witnesses give evidence, rather than overrule the original verdict they said the case had to be reheard by the High Court.
Does using a competitors’ name in Adwords mean there’s trademark infringement?
Bidding on a competitor’s trademark does not in itself constitute a trademark infringement. The issue is whether the ad as a whole suggests a connection with a trademark owner. Would the so-called “reasonably well-informed and reasonably attentive Internet user” be confused into believing that the ad emanates from the trademark proprietor?
In the High Court decision in the M&S case in May 2013, the court thought that a significant proportion of consumers who searched for ‘Interflora’, and then clicked on M&S’s ads, believed that M&S’s flower delivery service was part of the Interflora network.
The decision of the Court of Appeal underlines the difficulty of determining whether or not bidding on a competitor’s keyword infringes their trademark. The answer depends on the facts of each case. Relevant factors are what the ad says, what page it leads to and the relationship between the parties.
Also crucial in practical terms is whether the trademark owner whose keywords you are bidding on has the resources to sue you.
The key message is that it is not risk free. Litigation is possible and may deter some people from bidding on competitors’ keywords.

Google’s policy on trademarks as keywords
Google’s policy is to allow bidding on trademark names, which means more revenue for Google. This is helped by the fact that the standard advice of online marketing experts is to bid on your own name in case someone else does.
Bidding on a competitor’s name, even without featuring their name in your ad, means your name will appear every time your competitor’s name is searched. (Note that stating your competitor’s name in an ad is disallowed by Google due to trademark infringement implications). What M&S did was to pay Google so they could use ‘Interflora’ as a keyword. M&S’s advertisements for its own flower delivery service then appeared on the search engine results page when consumers searched for Interflora’s services using the word ‘Interflora’.
But bidding on competitors’ terms is expensive because such ads don’t perform well under Google’s Adwords criteria. Unless you have your competitor’s name on your landing page (which M&S did not, and which is generally unwise due to the risk of trademark infringement), Google will penalise you for irrelevancy. So your cost per click will be high, and it could have a negative account-wide impact on your Adwords campaigns too.
Nevertheless, the risk if a competitor gets there first is that their ads may have built up credibility with Google. As Adwords specialists Periscopix puts it in their blog post Should You Bid On Your Competitors’ Brand Terms?: ‘If they’ve had a clear run without any competition they’ll probably have racked up a good Click Through Rate and your bids will need to be higher to beat them’.
This seems to be saying that even if you subsequently bid on your own name, and even though your competitor’s website may not be as relevant as yours for your own brand name, the competitor’s ad may appear above yours.
Although possibly a theoretical point, the issue has practical relevance for companies in industries such as the hospitality sector, as their hotel rooms or restaurant tables are sold through other sites as well as their own.
 

Greg

Wanderlusting
Admin
#12
Here's another good article.... - http://blog.whitesharkmedia.com/using-competitors-names-as-keywords-adwords/

Competitors’ Names Can Be Good Keywords, But Be Careful
Using your competitors’ names and their brands to your campaign’s advantage is a good way to increase your potential conversions. You just have to follow the best practices mentioned throughout this article, and continuously monitor the campaign’s behavior in order to make sure that your competitors’ keywords are working to improve your campaign results.

Also, do keep in mind that since your webpage most likely doesn’t have content related to your competitor’s brands, it’s very likely that those keywords will have lower quality scores and higher CPCs as well.
 
Location
UT
#14
The only advice I can give quickly is that with AdWords and FB ads to ride the wave of low cost when it comes. I’ll randomly get super low CPC’s and I don’t always take advantage of them and then they’re gone. It’s especially true with FB ads.
 

Caleb

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Supporting Vendor
Location
Riverton
#15
Not sure how it would play in to your business but Pinterest gets clicks before Google or Facebook does. I don't remember the exact number but it's something like 23 days before doing a google search, the average housewife will see it on Pinterest. Now, I don't know how dry cleaning would play in to Pinterest (I honestly have never used Pinterest) so this might be nothing for you but something to consider when looking at digital channels.
 

rholbrook

Premium Member
Premium Member
Location
Kaysville, Ut
#16
Not sure how it would play in to your business but Pinterest gets clicks before Google or Facebook does. I don't remember the exact number but it's something like 23 days before doing a google search, the average housewife will see it on Pinterest. Now, I don't know how dry cleaning would play in to Pinterest (I honestly have never used Pinterest) so this might be nothing for you but something to consider when looking at digital channels.
Caleb, stay off of Pinterest. There are too any cool ideas on there from building an off-road trailer to building a gun room. Serious time waster.
 
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