No more state safety inspection in utah

SWALLDOG

Active Member
Location
WX, UTAH
#1
Wondering what everyone thinks of utah possibly not having a state vehicle inspection anymore at the end of the year. I've been checking rme the last 2 days so see if there was a thread and didn't see one, so I thought I better start it. Lol.

I've got mixed feelings about it. On one hand I'm excited because my modified vehicles are always a hassle on safety because most inspectors don't know what they are looking at.

On the other hand I think it's good to make sure the vehicles on the road are safe. I like to think I'm pretty good at inspecting and maintaining my vehicles. That being said when we got my wife's '12 Tahoe inspected last year it had a warn unit bearing that I hadn't caught yet.

I also wonder what the specifics will be. I know other states that don't have a state safety inspection still require your vehicle to meet all those safety requirements. So you can still get pulled over and sited for mud flaps, tint or whatever.

http://www.sltrib.com/home/5030862-155/utah-legislature-poised-to-end-mandatory

Probably at work under a truck
 

zukgod1

Senior crawler
Location
Utah County
#3
It's a double edged sword for me. Not having to tell customers they HAVE to fix it to license it is going to be nice but, knowing what we see at my shop on a daily basis scares me and a lot of that people do not want to fix their vehicle..
Scary.

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#4
I dont like it. Whoever was stupid enough to come up with this should be removed from position.

When I did state I inspections in west valley back in the day. We would have a ton of cars come in with bad tie rods or balljoints. I wouldn't want someone on the freeway next to me doing 70 with suspension hanging by a thread.
This politician should be shot.

I wonder how the highway patrol feels about this ????

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#5
As long as your tires are covered, I don't see any cops pulling you over. I like to make my vehicles as plain as I can. I never get pulled over for anything. Then again, I don't drive too crazy either.

I'm glad its gone. Its funny how I survived all my life without a safety inspection of my cars until I came to Utah. Are they doing away with emissions testing as well?
 

Herzog

somewhat damaged
Admin
Location
Kamas, UT
#8
They are raising the registration fee $1 to pay for more hwy patrol, so I'm guessing that means more rolling enforcements and fix-it tickets.

In a way I'm glad inspections will go away if signed. Less nanny-state legislation is a good thing IMO. People are too dependent on this kind of stuff, which to me is more scary.
 

Spork

Tin Foil Hat Equipped
#9
As long as your tires are covered, I don't see any cops pulling you over. I like to make my vehicles as plain as I can. I never get pulled over for anything. Then again, I don't drive too crazy either.

I'm glad its gone. Its funny how I survived all my life without a safety inspection of my cars until I came to Utah. Are they doing away with emissions testing as well?
I believe emissions will still be required. It's tied to EPA requirements for air so as long as we have people complaining about the inversion they will most likely remain.
 

SWALLDOG

Active Member
Location
WX, UTAH
#10
I wonder how the highway patrol feels about this ????

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I'm sure they are not happy about it. Last year at out MSHA refresher we usually have a UHP speaking for part of it. He said that the major cause of accidents was speed and following to close. So I asked him why they changed the following distance from 3 to 2 seconds and the speeds up to 80? He told me they had nothing to do w it and were against it. But some politicians pushed for it and got it passed. I imagine​ this is they same type of thing.

Also I want to know more about 25million that the tax payers will supposedly save. Is that just the $17 inspection fee? I would think anyone looking at that would see it as loosing 25million in revenue for utah. I also would like to know how much time and money goes in to the safety inspection program now and what that will change to.


Probably at work under a truck
 

Magerdgr

Have gun, will travel
#11
UHP/DPS actually supports the change. Lawmakers cited the fact that the majority of states no longer require safety inspection (only 16 still do) and states that have done away with the requirement have seen no increase in accidents related to equipment failures. All on the state DPS website.

https://publicsafety.utah.gov/2017/03/09/dps-statement-on-the-passing-of-hb265-and-hb155/

Also, for the record, I'm for it. I like the gov't butting out and having citizens be responsible for themselves.
 

jeeper

Currently without Jeep
Location
So Jo, Ut
#12
I don't think I like it.
I usualky wait until inspections come around before I replace the required parts on my truck.
I have had to put a windshield in my Colorado every year. You can bet that if I don't have to, I won't.
I can only imagine there are millions of people like me. I see vehicles going under maintained in the future.
Also, in the case of my mother or mother-in-law, who are both single women and are clueless as to vehicles, the only time either of them know something is wrong is when they fail a safety. Without annual checks, they may suffer negative affects. It would be nice if their oil shops stepped up and did some sort of inspection each time to help maintain their vehicles.. but that's not going to happen.
I totally understand that each driver should be responsible for regular checks on their vehicle.. but the reality is that it just won't happen.

Don't get me wrong, I will benefit greatly from the change. I will save hundreds each year in varied costs.. but I still don't think it is wise.


One thought I had on the 'no increase in accidents' claim, I am curious how they determine their findings..
for example: if I have bald tires, and slide in the snow creating an accident, that would be blamed on weather, not tires. A routine inspection would have required new tires.
 

Hickey

Rusty Girdle
Premium Member
#13
My wife spent many years in the collision repair field. Every winter, she would comment on how many people came in with crashed cars and their tires were bald. Not bald enough to fail inspection, but close. Those people are already on the road, regardless of the inspection rules.
 

Caleb

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Supporting Vendor
Location
Riverton
#14
I can go either way on this. I agree that the less government involvement the better and I've never had to use inspections as a reminder to do shit to my vehicles. I do wonder though, if safety is no longer required, does that mean to get my dirt bike registered I'll just have to go pay (emissions haven't been required on them)? I wonder if it'll be something like Maryland does in that when you first register a vehicle in your name (new or used) you have to get it inspected, from then on you no longer need to?
 

Spork

Tin Foil Hat Equipped
#15
I can go either way on this. I agree that the less government involvement the better and I've never had to use inspections as a reminder to do shit to my vehicles. I do wonder though, if safety is no longer required, does that mean to get my dirt bike registered I'll just have to go pay (emissions haven't been required on them)? I wonder if it'll be something like Maryland does in that when you first register a vehicle in your name (new or used) you have to get it inspected, from then on you no longer need to?
I'd imagine it would be like the current method of registering a boat. Worst case scenario, an officer verifies the paperwork matches the VIN and you go into the DMV and pay for a plate.
 

jeeper

Currently without Jeep
Location
So Jo, Ut
#16
^the dirt bike thing is exactly to my point. I would love to get a plate for my dirt bike. I can fudge it through the first time, and never worry about it again.

So, once again, I benefit.. but think it unwise.
 

Houndoc

Registered User
Location
Grantsville
#18
I agree it is a bad idea. I heard the argument that it isn't needed because faulty vehicles cause a very small percent of accidents in the state. To me, that says the program works.

I think the current system was a good compromise where it wasn't required yearly on newer vehicles.
 
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