Any Mtn Bikers on RME?

Location
UT
Tess and I are thinking of heading down to St. George/Hurricane this weekend to celebrate her recovery and her first bike ride since pregnancy. Anyone want to join? We're thinking church rocks, or wire mesa, or maybe little creek mesa. She's technically not supposed to ride 'till 6 weeks after pregnancy. We'll be at 5 weeks, so we'll be taking it easy.
 

benjy

A lot of loose ends
Premium Member
Location
Sand Hollow
Tess and I are thinking of heading down to St. George/Hurricane this weekend to celebrate her recovery and her first bike ride since pregnancy. Anyone want to join? We're thinking church rocks, or wire mesa, or maybe little creek mesa. She's technically not supposed to ride 'till 6 weeks after pregnancy. We'll be at 5 weeks, so we'll be taking it easy.
Ummm, yes!
 
The filler is nickel bronze. I brazed it mostly because I like the look of it and it’s fun to do and different. We have a couple TIG machines at work so I could have if I had wanted to. Most aluminum frames really ought to be heat treated (some alloys don’t need it) after welding which is far beyond my garage building capabilities. I would need a lot more practice on aluminum too. Sometimes I can stack dimes and sometimes... it’s just bad.
If you use high end steel you can build a frame that will be within a few hundred grams of a similar aluminum frame. Aluminum is not as strong so the tube wall thickness is way thicker.
 
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paragonmachineworks.com sells head tubes, BBs, dropouts, cable guides etc... Reasonable pricing and very nice stuff.
bikefabsupply.com is out of Arizona. I bought tubing and brazing supplies from him
cycle-frames.com is a good place to buy inexpensive tubes. They have most things you need to build a bike and are less expensive than Paragon. I believe you can even get a "tube set" to build a standardish 29er.
I would probably plan your frame and buy individual tubes though. If you are really light or heavy you will definitely want to adjust the tube diameters and wall thicknesses to refelect that. Otherwise you end up with a frame that rides like a freeway bridge I beam or a pasta noodle.

My down tube is 38mm diameter with .9/.6/.9mm (tubing is butted) wall thickness. I weigh 200 lbs and will beat this bike.
If I built it for my 13 year old son who weighs 90 lbs and is very much a cross country rider I could do a 32mm diameter downtube with .8/.5/.8mm wall thickness. I could maybe even go .7/.4/.7mm but that's sooo thin it starts to be challenging to make the joint.
It's fun because you can tune the frame to ride how you want. Any production bike has to be built to take a beating from a heavy rider regardless of the frame size or the actual weight of the end user.
 

benjy

A lot of loose ends
Premium Member
Location
Sand Hollow
I'm thinking hard about pulling the trigger on a Canfield epo. I've always wanted to build my own bike from the ground up, and this seems to be an awesome starting point. Hard to beat $800.

http://canfieldbrothers.com/frames/epo-carbon-hardtail-29er

I've only ridden full suspension bikes for the last 10 years, anyone care to talk me out of it? I have a giant trance 2, but I think I'd sell that to help fund the build, so this would be my only bike.
 
I can’t talk you out of it. I used to ride hardtails exclusively and it really helped to make me an awesome rider. I actually had people comment on group rides that they liked following me because I could pick good lines. I had to pick good lines to keep up with a bunch of good riders on full suspension bikes. Riding a hard tail forces you to up your game. You will generally have to ride more aggressively on a hard tail but I find it very rewarding.
Same with building up a frame. Somehow it’s more fun on a bike when you put it together. Canfield makes cool stuff. I looked at their bikes for geometry ideas for mine. And $800 is a steal for a carbon frame like that.
 
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